Art of Storytelling

So in November last year (2012), I attended (for the first time) Mindvalley’s Awesomeness Fest in Cancun Mexico.

It was pretty freakin’ awesome … but this isn’t about plugging the Awesomeness Fest. It’s about storytelling.

One of the speakers was a lady named Lisa Nichols. I had never heard of her, but she’s pretty big in the U.S. Kinda like an Oprah Winfrey “lite” I guess.

Lisa is a motivational speaker storyteller. She was born to speak. It’s her God given talent. You’ll see what I mean shortly.

Every single marketing message she delivers is wrapped up in an emotional motivational story, that moves hearts (she gets everyone to cry).

No other speaker at the event delivered a message with the same impact as Lisa.

I wasn’t even really interested in her “sales message” at the end of her final talk. I’m not her target customer anyway. But man, was I transfixed on every word she was saying.

During her final presentation I said to myself, “I gotta get access to this presentation”. Even if I have to bribe Vishen Lakhiani.

Well I did get access to it (no bribery required either).

Lisa says it’s not just about “telling” a story—anyone can do that—it’s about SHOWING the story.

For Lisa, and how she coaches her students–she’s also a speaking coach—the “showing” part is largely visual, on stage…

Moving.

Message cadence.

Pausing for effect.

Facial expressions.

Arm movements.

Role-playing. Etc.

The takeaway for me though, was how she uses story to drive to the point she’s teaching. The art of using story to create the context for a sales message that will be delivered later.

… and although Lisa didn’t present it this way, the “showing” can absolutely be done using just words on a page or in an email.

No different to reading a well written book. Where you, as the reader, paint a mental picture of the story. Language is the link between you and everything you need/want/desire.

Within the 52 minute video below Lisa tells three stories. Each one has a “message” which she then explains afterwards.

It’s a real treat.

In AutoResponder Madness I teach how I:

  1. take random life experiences
  2. then later turn it into a story what creates context
  3. for the marketing message I deliver to an audience

In the video below Lisa explains how she does it. How she takes ideas and experiences that later become “stories” she uses in her marketing.

It’s a nice contrast. It’ll give you another perspective on how to do this stuff.

The simple workflow goes like this:

  1. What is the marketing message you want to send?
  2. Find a story that creates context and a lead-in to deliver #1.

In a nutshell … the “story” becomes the (emotional) delivery vehicle of your (marketing) message.

Here’s the video…

Enjoy!

— Andre “Yes! Yes!” Chaperon

P.S.

By the way — here are a list of books that I own that teach different elements about the art of storytelling: